New York Giants Offseason 2019

    Diese Seite verwendet Cookies. Durch die Nutzung unserer Seite erklären Sie sich damit einverstanden, dass wir Cookies setzen. Weitere Informationen

    • Das Verteidigen der Entscheidung Jones an #6 zu ziehen erinnert mich stark an vergangenes Jahr mit Barkley an #2. Da wurde vom Giants-Lager die Entscheidung auch gut geredet, aber einen RB an #2 zu nehmen, vor allem mit dem Teams-Stand war und ist völlig Banane.
      Jones ist anders, da geht es weniger um die Position sondern den Spieler an sich. Für mich ist er maximal ein Backup-QB in der NFL. Klar kann man sagen, das weiß doch heute keiner so genau, das kann man aber halt bei jedem Spieler anbringen, für viele ist er halt einfach kein Franchise-QB und dafür gibt es ja auch genügend Gründe wo man sich ja auch von ihm ein Bild machen konnte.
      Im Endeffekt sagen halt viele einfach nur ihre Meinung was sie von diesem Spieler halten, dabei geht es ja nicht darum dass er jetzt für die Giants spielt, hätten die Broncos ihn an 10 genommen, dann würde es nicht anders sein. Klar können all diese Leute daneben liegen, aber es hat schon seine Gründe wieso so viele ihn kritisch einordnen, kommt ja nicht von ungefähr und das liegt auch nicht daran dass Jones diesen Leuten die Freundin ausgespannt oder ihnen die Reifen zerstochen hat, das ist einfach eine rein objektive Einschätzung.

      Gettleman ist für mich mit der schlechteste GM der ganzen Liga und was der letztes als auch dieses Jahr alles veranstaltet hat, grenzt an eine Horrorshow. Sehe nicht wo ich dem auch nur 1% Vertrauen schenken soll wenn der einen Jones an #6 nimmt. Geht das jetzt schief, dann ist er eh Geschichte und es wird eh vieles wieder über Bord geworfen, Problem ist halt nur dass die Giants in diesem Szenario wieder einiges an Zeit verlieren.
      Natürlich kann es auch andersrum laufen, nur darf man bei den Giants unter der Leitung von Gettleman durchaus berechtigte Zweifel haben.

      Dieser Beitrag wurde bereits 1 mal editiert, zuletzt von Daywalker ()

    • New York Giants Draft Class 2019

      Hier mal ein paar Auszüge aus Dane Brugler's 2019 NFL Draft Guide zu den einzelnen Giants Draft Picks 2019.
      Zu George Asafo-Adjei (Round 7 ‧ Pick 232) liegt kein Bericht vor!

      Quelle: THE ATHLETIC’S 2019 NFL DRAFT GUIDE By Dane Brugler
      ‘The Beast’ is here: Dane Brugler’s 2019 NFL Draft Guide
      The Athletic
      Dane Brugler: Twitter
      & The Athletic



      1. Daniel Jones | QB | Duke | Age: 21 (5/27/1997) | Round 1 ‧ Pick 6
      Spoiler anzeigen

      Dave Gettleman schrieb:

      "I know for a fact there were two teams who would have taken (Jones) before 17... It wasn't easy for me to pass up Josh Allen.
      It was very very difficult. But I think that much of Daniel Jones and his future as an NFL QB."


      Quelle: THE ATHLETIC’S 2019 NFL DRAFT GUIDE By Dane Brugler
      ‘The Beast’ is here: Dane Brugler’s 2019 NFL Draft Guide

      BACKGROUND:
      A two-star quarterback recruit out of high school, Daniel Jones was a standout in football and basketball at Charlotte Latin. He finished with school records in passing yards (6,997) and total touchdowns (98) and earned all-state honors his junior and senior seasons,
      leading Charlotte Latin to back-to-back Division I state championship games. Jones broke his right (throwing) wrist playing basketball during his junior season, which prevented him from attending any recruiting camps prior to his senior year – he also grew four inches during his junior year in high school.
      He initially committed to Princeton (his only scholarship offer), but a late push at Duke (his dream school) earned him a grayshirt opportunity – the Blue Devils’ 2015 recruiting class was full, so head coach David Cutcliffe asked him to walk on with the promise of a scholarship once a spot opened (he was awarded a scholarship the following July).
      After redshirting in 2015, Jones was set to be the backup in 2016 before incumbent starter Thomas Sirk suffered a partial tear of his Achilles in August, thrusting Jones into the role.
      He has six siblings who played Division I sports, including a younger sister (Ruthie) who recently signed with Duke soccer as one of the top goalkeeper recruits in the country.
      Jones elected skip his senior season and enter the 2019 NFL Draft, accepting an invitation to the 2019 Senior Bowl.

      STRENGTHS:
      Tall, average-sized frame…quick trigger to read and fire…recognizes coverage assignments and finds the out…has a pre-snap plan…slightly above- average arm strength…understands placement on downfield routes (posts, corners, etc.),
      setting the school record with 10 career touchdown passes of 50-plus yards…places the ball where his receiver can attack and make a move (holds the Duke career record with a 26.3 completion-to-interception ratio)
      …not a twitchy athlete, but mobility is an asset (comfortable throwing off platform)…excellent pocket movement, stepping up and keeping his eyes elevated…stronger and tougher than he looks to brush off contact –
      missed only two games following left shoulder surgery (September 2018)…graduated with a degree in economics (December 2018)…two-time team captain with “impeccable character,” according to Cutcliffe.

      WEAKNESSES:
      Eye manipulation and internal clock are undeveloped…needs to find better balance between not rushing his process, but also playing with urgency…caught staring down routes, leading defenders to the target…still finding his touch as a passer
      …deep-ball timing is an issue, increasing the difficulty level…lacks elite arm strength to easily add extra RPMs…needs to take better care of the football…mild-mannered personality and still finding his voice as a leader…
      pedestrian career production with 59.6 percent completions and a 17-19 record as a starter – never earned All-ACC honors.

      SUMMARY:
      A three-year starter at Duke, Jones was groomed in the Blue Devils’ spread, no-huddle offense, which incorporated RPO concepts and asked him to use his legs (averaged double-digit carries per game over his 36 starts).
      A late bloomer, he developed under Cutcliffe’s watchful eye and it is easy to see the Manning influence with his footwork, pocket mannerisms and his release.
      While he does not have a very impressive resume on paper, Jones elevated the average talent around him on the Duke offense, relying on both his arm and legs.
      His low-key personality might not immediately win over a room, but he competes with a quiet confidence and does not show any fear on the football field.
      Overall, Jones does not have any exceptional physical traits and his internal clock requires work, but he is a cerebral passer who makes accurate reads with active eyes and feet, projecting as a B-level NFL starter.

      Duke QB Daniel Jones' 1st Round Talent as Told by Coaches, Teammates, & Family



      2. Dexter Lawrence | DT | Clemson | Age: 21 (11/12/1997) | Round 1 ‧ Pick 17
      Spoiler anzeigen

      Quelle: THE ATHLETIC’S 2019 NFL DRAFT GUIDE By Dane Brugler
      ‘The Beast’ is here: Dane Brugler’s 2019 NFL Draft Guide

      BACKGROUND:
      A five-star defensive tackle recruit out of high school, Dexter Lawrence was a standout football, track and basketball player at Wake Forest (where he was teammates with Stanford RB Bryce Love).
      After leading the team to a 15-1 record as a junior, he earned First Team All-State (received the most votes on the defensive team) as a senior with 91 tackles, 21.0 tackles for loss and 13.0 sacks.
      Lawrence finished his prep career with 204 tackles, 65.0 tackles for loss and 28.0 sacks. He was the No. 2 player in the 2016 recruiting class behind only Rashan Gary and narrowed his college choices to Alabama, Clemson, Florida, Ohio State and USC, choosing the Tigers (his first offer).
      Lawrence elected to skip his senior season and enter the 2019 NFL Draft.

      STRENGTHS:
      Broad-shouldered, filled-out frame…smoothly carries his proportionate weight and doesn’t look or move overweight…outstanding raw power to anchor, absorb and stay off the ground
      …controls the point of attack to create 12-car pile-ups on inside run plays…naturally balanced to work off contact…controls his momentum well to redirect, break down and finish
      …flashes the flexible hips to work tight spaces…can move blockers when he has a step of momentum…hits like a bulldozer…plays through injuries and started double-digit games each of his three seasons.

      WEAKNESSES:
      Undeveloped pass rusher…doesn’t consistently use bully tactics and his bark is worse than his bite…allows his pads to rise at contact and would benefit from better roll and leverage in his straight-line rush attempts
      …prefers to rip instead of push, but doesn’t routinely displace or toss single blockers…below-average backfield vision…wears down easily and leans on blocks…secondary measures are absent once his initial move is halted
      …his best production came during his true freshman season…underwent toe surgery during the 2017 offseason, which caused a “nerve block” and lost feeling in his leg, forcing him to play “about 45-50%” during the 2017 season
      …suspended for the 2018 Cotton Bowl and the national title game after he tested positive for ostarine, a banned performance-enhancing drug.

      SUMMARY:
      A three-year starter at Clemson, Lawrence made an immediate impact for the Tigers, lining up primarily as the nose guard while also seeing snaps over the B-gap and off the edge.
      After posting career-best production as a true freshman, he fell short of those numbers the past two seasons, including snaps, playing only 47.1% of Clemson’s defensive plays in 2018.
      Lawrence flashes dominant qualities as a run defender with his ability to stack the point of attack and not concede ground, using his natural power to two-gap.
      He is a smooth mover for a 350-pounder, but his best pass rush tape came when he could get a step of momentum off the edge, currently lacking interior pass rush value.
      Overall, Lawrence is not yet the sum of his parts, but he possesses a rare blend of size, strength and movement skills, projecting as a space-eating run defender with the potential to be more as a pass rusher.



      3. DeAndre Baker | CB | Georgia | Age: 22 (9/4/1996) | Round 1 ‧ Pick 30
      Spoiler anzeigen

      Quelle: THE ATHLETIC’S 2019 NFL DRAFT GUIDE By Dane Brugler
      ‘The Beast’ is here: Dane Brugler’s 2019 NFL Draft Guide

      BACKGROUND:
      A three-star cornerback recruit out of high school, Deandre Baker played running back and wide receiver most of his youth before moving to cornerback following his sophomore year at Miami Northwestern for more playing time.
      He also ran track and earned all-state honors in the 200- and 400-meter dash in 2014. Baker was not ranked among the top-50 recruits in the state of Florida, but he received plenty of interest, turning down offers from schools like Alabama, Clemson and Texas to sign with Georgia (his dream school).
      He grew up in the crime-stricken Liberty City community in northwest Miami, but his parents provided a structured environment and kept him focused on football and education. Baker’s father (Andre) helped instill a strong work ethic in him at a young age.
      He skipped the Sugar Bowl and declined his invitation to the 2019 Senior Bowl.

      STRENGTHS:
      Coordinated movement skills at the snap and downfield…stays a step ahead due to his above-average instincts and route recognition…sits on patterns and stays dialed in to click-and-close or carry receivers vertically…aggressively uses the sideline and gets physical in coverage
      …uses his length to work around receivers and fight through their hands…coaches will love what he brings in run support, arriving with thump and competing with terrific finish…doesn’t allow himself to be bullied by blockers
      …quiet and introverted by nature, but plays confident and grew as a leader in college (former Georgia DC Mel Tucker: “He works really hard in practice, he’s developed in the meeting room, he’s emerged as a leader for us.”)

      WEAKNESSES:
      Only average long speed for the position, lacking secondary jets to easily recover…desire to bait can lead to spacing issues…will attract attention from officials for his grabbing downfield
      …has a few personal foul penalties on his tape for late hits…tackling technique comes and goes, occasionally using his shoulder or attempting to hug-and-throw…prematurely opens his hips, giving up inside position too easily
      …lacks much jam experience…doesn’t have extensive experience as an inside cornerback…perceived lax demeanor will be a turn off for some coaches.

      SUMMARY:
      A three-year starter at Georgia, Baker lined up primarily at right cornerback and put together a strong senior season, becoming the first UGA player to win the Jim Thorpe Award as the nation’s top defensive back.
      He is attempting to become the first Georgia cornerback drafted in the first round since 1999 (Champ Bailey). Baker’s tape shows the quickness, fluidity and instincts to play in both zone and man coverage, along with the toughness to make plays in run support.
      His hands-on approach is one of his best qualities, but you must live with the other side of the sword too, as his aggressive nature will lead to penalties or mistakes.
      Overall, Baker is not an elite size/speed prospect, but he shows the innate ability to diagnose routes and put himself in position to make plays, projecting as an NFL starter, ideally suited in a cover-2 scheme.

      How New York Giants' Deandre Baker Became The NFL's Next Shutdown Cornerback



      4. Oshane Ximines | EDGE | Old Dominion | Age: 23 (12/7/1995) | Round 3 ‧ Pick 95
      Spoiler anzeigen

      Quelle: THE ATHLETIC’S 2019 NFL DRAFT GUIDE By Dane Brugler
      ‘The Beast’ is here: Dane Brugler’s 2019 NFL Draft Guide

      STRENGTHS:
      Flexible edge athleticism with first step burst and active hands…stride acceleration to close once he wraps the corner…quick feet to slip through creases on the line of scrimmage…uses bend and long-armed extension to create movement
      …smooth hips to cleanly redirect in space…knack for punching the ball out with 11 forced fumbles the last three seasons…outstanding career production
      …his teammates glow about his work ethic and vocal leadership (organized a players-only meeting days before the 2018 upset of Virginia Tech).

      WEAKNESSES:
      Cut up body type, but looks more like a linebacker than edge rusher…average-at-best play strength…struggles to disengage once blockers latch onto his frame…violent hands, but his move-to-move transition requires refinement
      …inconsistent edge setter and not a technician at the point of attack…wasn’t asked to drop or cover in college.

      SUMMARY:
      A four-year starter at Old Dominion, Ximines played the “Stud” pass rusher position in the Monarchs’ four-man front, rushing with his hand on the ground, standing up on the edge or floating over the A-gap.
      He owns the school records for career sacks (33.0), tackles for loss (51.5) and forced fumbles (11) and will likely be the first Old Dominion player selected in the NFL Draft. Ximines has the edge athleticism to wrap the corner and wreak havoc, showcasing a sophisticated approach to his rush.
      He is an inconsistent run defender, mostly due to his undersized frame, and was strictly an upfield player in college, lacking experience dropping in space.
      Overall, Ximines is a speed-based pass rusher with tweener size and play strength, displaying active hands and motor to be a nickel rusher as a rookie.

      Oshane Ximines expected to be first ever ODU draft pick



      5. Julian Love | CB | Notre Dame | Age: 21 (3/19/1996) | Round 4 ‧ Pick 108
      Spoiler anzeigen

      Quelle: THE ATHLETIC’S 2019 NFL DRAFT GUIDE By Dane Brugler
      ‘The Beast’ is here: Dane Brugler’s 2019 NFL Draft Guide

      BACKGROUND:
      A three-star cornerback recruit out of high school, Julian Love started playing football in elementary school and was a do-everything performer at Nazareth, playing offense, defense and special teams.
      He led the team to back-to-back Class 5A State Championships his junior and senior years, earning All-State honors both seasons.
      As a senior, Love posted 92 tackles, 19.0 tackles for loss and three forced fumbles, adding 1,067 rushing yards, 662 receiving yards and 25 offensive touchdowns.
      He was the No. 46 cornerback recruit in the 2016 class and received mostly Big Ten offers (Iowa, Illinois, Northwestern) until Notre Dame (his dream school) offered, committing as a junior.
      Love’s father (D.T.) played college basketball and his younger brother (Michael) was a part of the Northern Illinois 2019 recruiting class as a running back. Love elected to skip his senior season and enter the 2019 NFL Draft.

      STRENGTHS:
      Outstanding agility…coordinated pedal to smoothly transition and stay on the same plane vertically…quick to diagnose routes and sort out what he sees…unlocks his hips to drive on throws…instinctively tracks the ball downfield
      …trustworthy to compete when the ball is in the air…outstanding ball production with 44 passes defended in 34 career starts…accurately reads the eyes/movements of receivers to make plays with his back to the ball
      …doesn’t lack for toughness as a run defender…offensive background shows with the ball in his hands, averaging 31.8 yards per interception return (5/159/2)
      …his extensive film study and detailed preparation are clear on game day…low-key personality and allows his play to do the talking.

      WEAKNESSES:
      Questionable long-speed for the position, struggling to close the gap once receivers gain a step…lacks burst in his movements, struggling to easily recover after a misstep…undersized by NFL standards and his lack of inches are obvious vs. bigger receivers (see 2018 Stanford tape)
      …inexperienced jamming or disrupting routes…too easily moved by blockers and removed from the run game…too many shoe-string tackle attempts on his film…missed most of the Cotton Bowl after failing the concussion protocol (December 2018).

      SUMMARY:
      A three-year starter at Notre Dame, Love played primarily in the boundary in the Irish’s man-heavy scheme, moving inside in nickel situations. He was among the FBS leaders in passes defended each of the last two seasons, breaking the school record with 44 career passes defended.
      Although his recovery athleticism is a concern, Love plays with balanced footwork to mirror routes, gain positioning and make plays with his elite-level ball skills. He trusts his eyes and instincts and won’t panic, but his lack of length is evident vs. large-framed targets.
      Overall, Love’s lack of ideal size, speed and suddenness will be tougher to mask vs. NFL receivers, but his velvet feet, intelligence and ball skills are the type of traits worth betting on, projecting best in the nickel.


      Immer schön den Ball hoch halten!
    • New York Giants Draft Class 2019

      6. Ryan Connelly | OLB | Wisconsin | Age: 23 (10/23/1995) | Round 5 ‧ Pick 143
      Spoiler anzeigen

      Quelle: THE ATHLETIC’S 2019 NFL DRAFT GUIDE By Dane Brugler
      ‘The Beast’ is here: Dane Brugler’s 2019 NFL Draft Guide

      BACKGROUND:
      A no-star recruit out of high school, Ryan Connelly was a three-year starting quarterback at Eden Prairie, leading the program to three straight Class 6A state championships his sophomore, junior and senior seasons.
      He finished his senior season with 14 touchdowns and no interceptions, but Eden Prairie was a run-heavy offense that focused on him handing the ball to a stable of backs.
      Connelly was also a three-year letterman in lacrosse, which kept him from attending too many football camps. As a recruit, he didn’t have any Division-I offers and jumped at the only opportunity he received (walk-on spot at Wisconsin) over playing Division II or III in Minnesota.
      Connelly didn’t have any delusions about playing quarterback in the Big Ten and added 30 pounds to his frame, forcing a move to linebacker on the scout team. He impressed enough during his redshirt year to earn a scholarship prior to the 2015 season.
      Midway through his senior year, Connelly found out that his mother (Christi) was diagnosed with lung cancer and he is now involved in raising money for cancer research.
      He accepted his invitation to the 2019 East-West Shrine Game, but was unable to play due to injury.

      STRENGTHS:
      Quick read/react skills…breaks down plays quickly, giving himself a head start…plays with burst to the football…speed looks the same on every snap and is enough to make plays at the sideline
      …finds a way to harmonize his discipline and aggression, using both as assets…violent play style and looks to drive through his target…played through a core/abdominal injury as a senior
      …graduated with a degree in economics (December 2018)…former walk-on and didn’t take long to earn a scholarship…coaches say he has a relentless commitment to his craft.

      WEAKNESSES:
      Below-average arm length with inconsistent take-on skills…spends too much time attached to blocks…late to win body position and can be redirected by tight ends
      …slight body tightness shows when attempting to tackle in space…average pursuit skills with little chance of recovery after a misstep…appears robotic when opening his hips in coverage
      …injured his core/abdominal muscles during the summer prior to his senior year and played through it as long as he could, undergoing surgery (December 2018) and missing the Bowl Game and Shrine Game.

      SUMMARY:
      A three-year starter at Wisconsin, Connelly morphed from walk-on quarterback to linebacker in Madison, lining up inside in the Badgers’ 3-4 base scheme.
      He out-worked more highly-recruited players when he arrived at Wisconsin and will out-work higher drafted players when he lands in an NFL training camp.
      Connelly competes like a lifelong linebacker, not a former quarterback, and has the competitive toughness required for NFL life.
      While he plays assignment sound, his stack/shed skills are undeveloped with straight-linish athleticism.
      Overall, Connelly has little margin for error with his skill-set, but he is an instinctive hunter with the special teams mentality that will give him a chance to make the 53-man roster.



      7. Darius Slayton | WR | Auburn | Age: 22 (1/12/1997) | Round 5 ‧ Pick 171
      Spoiler anzeigen

      Quelle: THE ATHLETIC’S 2019 NFL DRAFT GUIDE By Dane Brugler
      ‘The Beast’ is here: Dane Brugler’s 2019 NFL Draft Guide

      BACKGROUND:
      A four-star wide receiver recruit out of high school, Darius Slayton played wide receiver and cornerback at Greater Atlanta Christian. He was also one of the best track athletes in the state, winning state titles in the 100 meters (10.54) and 200 meters (21.51).
      On the football field, Slayton posted 39 catches for 788 yards and 12 touchdowns as a senior, earning All-State and U.S. Army All-American honors. He was recruited as both a wide receiver and cornerback and was ranked as the No. 16 recruit in the state of Georgia.
      Slayton fielded offers from Alabama, Ohio State, South Carolina and Tennessee before initially committing to in-state Georgia after his senior year. However, he flipped to Auburn on signing day. His cousin (Darrell Crawford) played linebacker at Auburn (1988-91).
      Slayton suffered a track injury his senior season in high school and was forced to redshirt in 2015. He elected to skip his senior season and enter the 2019 NFL Draft.

      STRENGTHS:
      Awesome speed…easy initial acceleration and sustains his pace to win vertically…efficient footwork to make hard stops mid-route…defensive backs must respect his deep speed, opening underneath options
      …flashes the foot quickness to frequently slip the first tackler, creating YAC…big-bodied target with the length to extend and make athletic plays on the football
      …body strength to keep his feet against off-balance tackle attempts…tracks deep throws well with 32 catches of 20-plus yards in his career (40.5 percent of his career receptions).

      WEAKNESSES:
      Too many focus drops on his college tape…allows impending contact (real or imagined) to disrupt his concentration…worked in a limited offense and needs to add more branches to his route tree
      …needs to be more efficient beating press coverage…holds the ball loose from his body, creating ball security concerns…lacks special teams experience
      …redshirted in 2015 after groin injury (from his senior year in high school running track), which required surgery (May 2015); minor injuries forced him to miss playing time the last two years.

      SUMMARY:
      A three-year starter at Auburn, Slayton was the boundary wideout in the Tigers’ spread scheme and was pigeonholed as the deep threat in the offense (accounted for eight career catches of 50-plus yards).
      With his track speed, he spent his much of his football life running past coverage and that wasn’t always the case in the SEC, forcing him to develop as a route-runner, which is an ongoing transformation.
      Slayton has the easy acceleration to push cornerbacks off the top of routes and the elusive feet to make defenders miss in space.
      He needs to continue his development in two key areas to reach his potential: expanding his route tree and becoming a better finisher when the ball is in the air.
      Overall, Slayton has inconsistencies to his game, but he is much more than simply a speed demon, showcasing fluid athleticism and length to make catches outside his framework, projecting as a high-upside developmental receiver.



      8. Corey Ballentine | CB | Washburn | Age: 23 (4/13/1996) | Round 6 ‧ Pick 180
      Spoiler anzeigen

      Quelle: THE ATHLETIC’S 2019 NFL DRAFT GUIDE By Dane Brugler
      ‘The Beast’ is here: Dane Brugler’s 2019 NFL Draft Guide

      BACKGROUND:
      A no-star recruit out of high school, Corey Ballentine played football his junior and senior seasons at Shawnee Heights, but he was a more accomplished track athlete in high school. He was part of the school’s state champion 4x400-meter relay team and finished second in the 400-meters (48.97).
      Ballentine was underrecruited and signed with Division-II Washburn, almost quitting in his first year as a redshirt. He worked his way into the starting rotation as a sophomore safety before moving to cornerback for his final two seasons.
      Ballentine also ran track at Washburn and owns eight of the 10 fastest times in the 100- meter dash and the six fastest times in the 200-meter dash. He accepted his invitation to the 2019 Senior Bowl.

      STRENGTHS:
      Top-tier athlete…quick-footed with bump-and-run duties…flashes short-area burst and natural body control out of his pedal to stay in phase…stays coordinated in his change of direction
      …shrewdly uses his length downfield to cut off routes…crowds catch points and is always ball searching…his chippy play demeanor shows in run support…averaged 24.8 yards as a kickoff returner (47/1,166/0)
      …responsible for four blocked kicks, including three in 2018…coachable attitude and he works hard at his craft, learning things quickly…experienced outside and vs. the slot.

      WEAKNESSES:
      His lack of inches will show at times vs. bigger pass-catchers…can be late to find the football downfield…falls for eye candy and needs to sharpen his vision…inconsistent press-man technique and quick to grab if caught out of position
      …late to drive from off-coverage…average play strength for the position and needs to clean up his tackling technique…inexperienced vs. top competition.

      SUMMARY:
      A three-year starter at Washburn, Ballentine played safety as a sophomore before starting at right cornerback the past two seasons, often shadowing the opponent’s top receiver.
      He became the first player in school history to win the 2018 Cliff Harris Award as the top defensive player at a small school (Division II or lower).
      A sprinter on Washburn’s track team, Ballentine plays with the suddenness to stay in the pocket of receivers on tape and he didn’t look out of place vs. better competition during Senior Bowl week.
      He isn’t shy getting physical and his experience on special teams should help him earn a roster spot.
      Overall, Ballentine needs to tidy up the technical aspects of the position, but he has the athleticism to survive on an island with the coachable make-up that will set him apart during camp, projecting best in the slot.

      10. Chris Slayton | Defensive Tackle | Syracuse | Age: N/A | Round 7 ‧ Pick 245
      Spoiler anzeigen

      Quelle: THE ATHLETIC’S 2019 NFL DRAFT GUIDE By Dane Brugler
      ‘The Beast’ is here: Dane Brugler’s 2019 NFL Draft Guide

      BACKGROUND:
      A three-star linebacker recruit out of high school, Christopher “Chris” Slayton started playing football his freshman year at Crete Monee and earned a starting role on the defensive line his final two prep seasons.
      As a junior, he dropped basketball and focused on football, helping lead the team to a 14-0 record, including the 2012 state championship. Slayton was the No. 20 recruit in the state of Illinois and committed to Syracuse over offers from Illinois, Missouri and Wisconsin.
      He bounced between defensive tackle and end his first two seasons before setting in as a three-technique his final two seasons. Slayton accepted his invitation to the 2019 East-West Shrine Game.

      STRENGTHS:
      Powerfully built with adequate length…throws plates around in the weight room and that strength translates to the field…muscle bound, but not tight in his movements, redirecting smoothly to chase
      …strikes with power and pad level…stays balanced at contact to track and maintain positioning…counters well in response to blockers, chopping down hands and displacing wrists
      …competes an edge required for trench warfare…senior captain and seasoned veteran with four years of starting experience.

      WEAKNESSES:
      Not an explosive player…leaves production on the field due to ordinary athleticism, struggling to chase down plays or break down in space…his bull rush is met with resistance
      …powerful at the point of attack, but often inefficient with his hand usage…late to find the football, relying on his effort more than instincts to be his guiding light…too easily washed by angle blocks
      …wears down late in games and stamina level is a question mark…below-average production.

      SUMMARY:
      A four-year starter at Syracuse, Slayton was the starting three-technique in the Orange’s four-man front, also starting outside at defensive end earlier in his career.
      Despite playing in every game the last four seasons, including 42 career starts, his production is unimpressive, never logging more than 33 tackles in one season.
      Although he tends to wear down, Slayton is a power-packed lineman with the toughness and demeanor required for the position. However, he doesn’t display disruptive traits and his suspect instincts and shed skills might limit his ability to two-gap.
      Overall, Slayton isn’t a souped-up athlete or rangy playmaker, but he possesses the NFL-quality power that will give him the chance to earn a spot in an NFL defensive line rotation.


      Quelle: THE ATHLETIC’S 2019 NFL DRAFT GUIDE By Dane Brugler
      ‘The Beast’ is here: Dane Brugler’s 2019 NFL Draft Guide
      The Athletic
      Dane Brugler: Twitter
      & The Athletic
      Immer schön den Ball hoch halten!
    • Schlimme Nachrichten:

      RedditCFB schrieb:

      Tragic situation at Washburn: overnight shooting in Topeka left junior Dwane Simmons dead and Corey Ballentine—who had just been drafted by the New York Giants—injured (expected to make full recovery):
      "If Football doesn't work out behind the center, he is gonna be one heck of a football coach.
      And I wouldn't want to play against his team!"
      Jon Gruden on Kellen Moore - QB Camp 2012
    • EarthWindAndFire schrieb:

      EagleCologne schrieb:

      maruso schrieb:

      BigBlue1925 schrieb:

      Problem dabei, für Daniel Jones wurde massiv gereacht.

      EagleCologne schrieb:

      Jones an Nr.6, mit all den bpa, die man sich stattdessen hätte holen können? Jones wollte außer den Giants niemand in Rd.1, also warum dann nicht wenigstens nur den 17 Pick verwenden, oder besser down-traden, und man hat Jones immer noch sicher?

      DrBanane schrieb:

      Die Giants gehen auf ein Kurzpass-Scheme, was ok ist, doch dann nehme ich doch nicht Jones an 6, der auch noch an 17, 30 und in Runde 2 da gewesen wäre?!
      Ich finde es immer wieder interessant, wie sicher sich manche User hier sind, wann welcher Prospect noch verfügbar gewesen wäre. Habt ihr Einblick in die Draftboards der Teams oder wie kommt ihr zu euren felsenfesten Überzeugungen alá "Jones wäre auch noch in Runde 2 da gewesen!!!111elf"?
      Ja, theoretisch hätten sich auch die Jets die Jones-Rakete holen können. Weiß mans?! War schon ziemlich riskant von den Giants, dass sie sich nicht hochgetradet haben, und erst an 6.Stelle ihren zukünftigen franchise-qb gepickt haben. Völlig unverständlich, warum so viele Fans und Experten dieses Vorgehen von Gettleman kritisch sehen. :mrgreen: mobile.twitter.com/BigBlueVCR/…904200955460%2Fframe.html
      Nochmal: Man muss den Pick nicht gut finden. Wie bereits erwähnt hätte ich auch lieber Allen. Aber wenn eine Scouting Abteilung (in der jeder Praktikant mehr von der Materie versteht als die hier Anwesenden) zu dem Schluss kommt, dass Jones der zukünftige Franchise QB ist, muss man ihn mit dem 6. Pick nehmen. Wer weiß was die Broncos gemacht hätten wenn er noch da gewesen wäre. Jay Gruden hätte wohl auch Jones genommen und nicht Haskins (zumindest lt. Brugler).
      Wenn du ehrlich bist, dann weißt du nicht, ob die Scouts mehr Ahnung haben, als einige Schreiberlinge hier. Wenn man dann noch dazunimmt, dass die Scouts nur ihre Eindrücke schildern, der GM jedoch die Entscheidung trifft bzw. das Ranking aufstellt, dann ist die Aussage nicht wirklich richtig. Allerdings muss auch ich meine Aussage etwas revidieren bzw. korrigieren: Wenn man Jones will, dann kann man ihn als QB auch an 6 nehmen. Die Position ist so einen Pick wert, der Spieler nicht. Dass, was Draft Analysten und Experten über die vergangenen Monate gemacht haben, ist die Tape-Analyse. Die Eindrücke dort werden mit Erfahrungswerten und anderen Spielern verglichen, damit ein Eindruck entstehen kann. Sehr, sehr viele Experten sind sich da bezüglich der Schwächen von Jones einig und ein großer Punkt ist nun einmal die Accuracy, die man ab einem gewissen Alter nicht mehr coachen kann. Release, Mechanics, Fußarbeit - all das kann man coachen, vom Spielverständnis ganz zu schweigen, denn das wird ohnehin durch die NFL-Erfahrung besser werden. Die Accuracy jedoch nicht.

      Hört man Gettleman dann weiter zu, dann war ja vor allem der Senior Bowl entscheidend und hier hat er sich "verliebt" und er kam zu dem Entschluss, dass Jones besser sei als Murray, Heskins und Lock. Jones warf beim Senior Bowl 8 Pässe! Selbst wenn die gut waren, so ist die Sample Size doch einfach zu klein und der GM redet sich hier um Kopf und Kragen. Auch der Plan, Jones nun eine gewisse Zeit hinter Eli sitzen zu lassen, wirft doch nur Fragezeichen auf. Wenn es so einen Plan gibt, dann nehme doch Darnold an 2 im 2018er Draft?! Von mir aus auch Josh Allen, wenn es denn unbedingt der Big QB sein muss. Barkley ist ein unfassbarer Spieler, ein Generationen-RB, aber das Team, das ihn geholt hat, beging trotzdem einen Fehler und muss jetzt alles daran setzen, einen QB zu entwickeln, der die Offense nicht nur verwaltet, sondern prägt. Das ist natürlich nicht unmöglich, wird aber eine riesige Aufgabe.

      Dieser Beitrag wurde bereits 1 mal editiert, zuletzt von DrBanane ()

    • Bei Jones wird die Zeit zeigen, ob ee nun ein großer Fehler war oder eben nicht.
      Ich verstehe allerdings immernoch nicht den Lawrence pick. Wir haben doch Hill und Tomlinson. Außerdem verstehe ich nicht wofür wir soo viele CB'brauchen. Was glaubt ihr wer hier gesezzt sein wird? Mich würde auch interessieren, was ihr flaubt wir wir mit Lawrence planen, bzw was glaubt ihr wie wird unsere defense aussehen mit den ganzen neuen (ximines, Golden,usw)?
    • sensimilia89 schrieb:

      Bei Jones wird die Zeit zeigen, ob ee nun ein großer Fehler war oder eben nicht.
      Ich verstehe allerdings immernoch nicht den Lawrence pick. Wir haben doch Hill und Tomlinson. Außerdem verstehe ich nicht wofür wir soo viele CB'brauchen. Was glaubt ihr wer hier gesezzt sein wird? Mich würde auch interessieren, was ihr flaubt wir wir mit Lawrence planen, bzw was glaubt ihr wie wird unsere defense aussehen mit den ganzen neuen (ximines, Golden,usw)?

      Wie schon geschrieben, wenn Jones „Ihr“ (Shurmur, Gettleman) QB ist, dann muss man ihn, wenn verfügbar, nehmen. Keiner kann garantieren ob er später noch verfügbar war oder nicht. Am Anfang war ich auch geschockt von dem Pick.

      Was Lawrence angeht, kann ich das auch nicht nachvollziehen. Tomlinson war als NT nach dem Trade von Snacks Harrison wesentlich besser als vorher als DE. Wenn man jetzt Lawrence als NT plant, dann wird Tomlinson wohl wieder DE spielen. Das das nicht passt hatten sie ja letztes Jahr indirekt gesagt, als sie meinten, dass er als NT mehr seine Fähigkeiten einsetzten kann. Nichts gegen Lawrence, er ist sicher ein top prospect, nur macht er halt kaum Sinn wenn man Tomlinson hat. Vielleicht erhoffen sie sich, dass er sich im Pass Rush verbessert und dort einen Einfluss auf das Spiel nehmen kann, bei Clemson wurde er ja hauptsächlich als Run Stopper genutzt. Hier muss man abwarten welchen Einfluss er tatsächlich hat, und als Fan hoffen, dass die D endlich mal wieder als solche bezeichnet werden darf und Lawrence auch gegen den Pass Einfluss hat.

      CB: Starter Jenkins, dahinter Beal (kann man bisher nicht wirklich einschätzen), 1rd Baker (könnte die Nr 2 sein), dahinter letztjähriger UDFA Grant (gute Ansätze als Nickel), dazu kommen Love und Ballentine aus dem diesjährigen Draft.
      Grundsätzlich kann man ja nie zu viele gute Spieler auf einer Position haben (gilt ja in der Theorie auch für die D-Line), dazu kommt, dass Jenkins auch nicht mehr der jüngste ist (er ist nicht alt, aber wird halt auch nicht jünger mit seinen 30, im oktober 31) und man könnte langsam mal einen neuen CB 1 entwickeln. Die secondary letztes Jahr war ja eher unterdurchschnittlich und nun hat man auf der Position einige Möglichkeiten, was ich in Ordnung finde.

      Grundsätzlich hat man sich punktuell verstärkt, ich hoffe, dass man das auch sehen wird im Herbst. Allerdings denke ich, darf man keine herausragenden Leistungen erwarten. Mit Glück hat man ne solide D, die dem Gegner auch mal stoppen kann und nicht wie letztes Jahr überrannt wird und bei 3rd down nicht vom Platz kommt.
      Warten wir’s ab.

      Ich hätte mir gewünscht, dass man an 17 ein O Tackle pickt, oder etwas zurücktradet. Nun ist es in the books, und jetzt liegt es an den Coaches, was draus zu machen.
    • Darauf, wie Jones sich entwickelt bin ich wirklich schwer gespannt. Das ungewöhnliche und von nur wenigen erwartete frühe draften setzt jedenfalls einige automatisch unter Druck (GM, Jones selber usw.), weil eben viele (Medien, "Experten", etc.) es (angeblich) besser wussten oder anders gemacht hätten.

      Bei den Redskins war es ja dagegen z.B. ja eher so, dass allgemein zugestimmt wird/wurde, dass er an dem Pick für das Team genau richtig war. Sollte er scheitern, werden wohl viele nur einfach mit den Schultern zucken. Bei euch bzw. Jones dürfte das anders sein. Häme, (nachträgliche) Besserwisserei und ev. harte Konsequenzen für euren GM dürften da dann wesentlich krasser ausfallen.
    • Wenn sich frühzeitige negative Prognosen im nachhinein bestätigen, ist es "(nachträgliche) Besserwisserei"? Interessanter und völlig unlogischer Ansatz. Wenn die Kritiker von Gettleman recht behalten, muss er seinen Hut nehmen, und zwar völlig zu recht.
    • So wie es aussieht wollten die Giants Jones eben unbedingt haben, aber meiner Meinung nach eben zu teuer erkauft.
      Das größte Problem an der ganzen Sache ist aber der Hype der um diesen Pick gemacht wird und das vor allem von Giants Fans.
      Man muss bedenken das man es hier mit einem ganz jungen Spieler zu tun hat auf den dadurch ein enormer Druck aufgebaut wird und das ist sicher nicht im Sinne des Teams.
      Daniel Jones ist sicherlich kein schlechter Spieler (für mich kein 1st Round Pick, aber das spielt keine Rolle), aber man sollte aufpassen das man den Jungen nicht schon kaputt macht bevor er seinen ersten Ball geworfen hat.
      Meddl Loide :rockon: :supz: :musi: :rock: :D
    • GermanRedskinsFan schrieb:

      So wie es aussieht wollten die Giants Jones eben unbedingt haben, aber meiner Meinung nach eben zu teuer erkauft.
      Das größte Problem an der ganzen Sache ist aber der Hype der um diesen Pick gemacht wird und das vor allem von Giants Fans.
      Man muss bedenken das man es hier mit einem ganz jungen Spieler zu tun hat auf den dadurch ein enormer Druck aufgebaut wird und das ist sicher nicht im Sinne des Teams.
      Daniel Jones ist sicherlich kein schlechter Spieler (für mich kein 1st Round Pick, aber das spielt keine Rolle), aber man sollte aufpassen das man den Jungen nicht schon kaputt macht bevor er seinen ersten Ball geworfen hat.
      Damit muss doch jeder Top10 QB Pick umgehen. Egal ob Goff, Wentz, Murray, Mayfield, Darnold..., nur um mal die aus den letzten Jahren zu nennen, hatten/haben alle enormen Druck, das gehört dazu. Entweder er kann damit umgehen und hat das nötige Talent oder nicht, die Rechnung ist nicht anders als bei allen anderen auch, Hype und Druck gibts überall.
    • Daywalker schrieb:

      GermanRedskinsFan schrieb:

      So wie es aussieht wollten die Giants Jones eben unbedingt haben, aber meiner Meinung nach eben zu teuer erkauft.
      Das größte Problem an der ganzen Sache ist aber der Hype der um diesen Pick gemacht wird und das vor allem von Giants Fans.
      Man muss bedenken das man es hier mit einem ganz jungen Spieler zu tun hat auf den dadurch ein enormer Druck aufgebaut wird und das ist sicher nicht im Sinne des Teams.
      Daniel Jones ist sicherlich kein schlechter Spieler (für mich kein 1st Round Pick, aber das spielt keine Rolle), aber man sollte aufpassen das man den Jungen nicht schon kaputt macht bevor er seinen ersten Ball geworfen hat.
      Damit muss doch jeder Top10 QB Pick umgehen. Egal ob Goff, Wentz, Murray, Mayfield, Darnold..., nur um mal die aus den letzten Jahren zu nennen, hatten/haben alle enormen Druck, das gehört dazu. Entweder er kann damit umgehen und hat das nötige Talent oder nicht, die Rechnung ist nicht anders als bei allen anderen auch, Hype und Druck gibts überall.

      Der Druck ist bei Jones im Vergleich zu Baker aber anders. Als Baker gepickt wurde, schwirrten im Netz nicht zig Videos rum, auf denen Personen ihre Fernseher zerschmetterten. Genauso gab es keine Videos, auf denen das FirstEnergy Stadium gebuht hat, als der Name Baker Mayfield fiel. Wenn man sieht, was für Videos und Tweets bzgl. Daniel Jones im Internet zu finden sind, dann hat es Jones sicherlich etwas schwieriger. Klar kann man jetzt sagen "das muss er als Top 10 Pick abkönnen", allerdings sollte man das Gesamte hier schon vergleichen und der Vergleich zwischen Jones und Baker hinkt diesbezüglich.
    • Basti86 schrieb:

      Daywalker schrieb:

      GermanRedskinsFan schrieb:

      So wie es aussieht wollten die Giants Jones eben unbedingt haben, aber meiner Meinung nach eben zu teuer erkauft.
      Das größte Problem an der ganzen Sache ist aber der Hype der um diesen Pick gemacht wird und das vor allem von Giants Fans.
      Man muss bedenken das man es hier mit einem ganz jungen Spieler zu tun hat auf den dadurch ein enormer Druck aufgebaut wird und das ist sicher nicht im Sinne des Teams.
      Daniel Jones ist sicherlich kein schlechter Spieler (für mich kein 1st Round Pick, aber das spielt keine Rolle), aber man sollte aufpassen das man den Jungen nicht schon kaputt macht bevor er seinen ersten Ball geworfen hat.
      Damit muss doch jeder Top10 QB Pick umgehen. Egal ob Goff, Wentz, Murray, Mayfield, Darnold..., nur um mal die aus den letzten Jahren zu nennen, hatten/haben alle enormen Druck, das gehört dazu. Entweder er kann damit umgehen und hat das nötige Talent oder nicht, die Rechnung ist nicht anders als bei allen anderen auch, Hype und Druck gibts überall.
      Der Druck ist bei Jones im Vergleich zu Baker aber anders. Als Baker gepickt wurde, schwirrten im Netz nicht zig Videos rum, auf denen Personen ihre Fernseher zerschmetterten. Genauso gab es keine Videos, auf denen das FirstEnergy Stadium gebuht hat, als der Name Baker Mayfield fiel. Wenn man sieht, was für Videos und Tweets bzgl. Daniel Jones im Internet zu finden sind, dann hat es Jones sicherlich etwas schwieriger. Klar kann man jetzt sagen "das muss er als Top 10 Pick abkönnen", allerdings sollte man das Gesamte hier schon vergleichen und der Vergleich zwischen Jones und Baker hinkt diesbezüglich.

      Ich denke diese nicht gerade überaus große Freude über den Pick geht bei vielen (zumindest bei mir :D ) nicht gegen den Spieler Jones sondern gegen die Entscheidung des GM/ Trainers / Owner etc.

      Und wenn Jones eins von Eli lernen kann, dann ja wohl einen Scheiß auf das zugeben was alle anderen sagen.

      bELIeve :ja:
    • Daywalker schrieb:

      GermanRedskinsFan schrieb:

      So wie es aussieht wollten die Giants Jones eben unbedingt haben, aber meiner Meinung nach eben zu teuer erkauft.
      Das größte Problem an der ganzen Sache ist aber der Hype der um diesen Pick gemacht wird und das vor allem von Giants Fans.
      Man muss bedenken das man es hier mit einem ganz jungen Spieler zu tun hat auf den dadurch ein enormer Druck aufgebaut wird und das ist sicher nicht im Sinne des Teams.
      Daniel Jones ist sicherlich kein schlechter Spieler (für mich kein 1st Round Pick, aber das spielt keine Rolle), aber man sollte aufpassen das man den Jungen nicht schon kaputt macht bevor er seinen ersten Ball geworfen hat.
      Damit muss doch jeder Top10 QB Pick umgehen. Egal ob Goff, Wentz, Murray, Mayfield, Darnold..., nur um mal die aus den letzten Jahren zu nennen, hatten/haben alle enormen Druck, das gehört dazu. Entweder er kann damit umgehen und hat das nötige Talent oder nicht, die Rechnung ist nicht anders als bei allen anderen auch, Hype und Druck gibts überall.
      Ja, da hast du recht, aber das ist ein anderes Ding.
      Alle Rookies haben diesen Druck. Der Unterschied ist aber das sie- wie soll ich sagen- Positiven Druck haben (weiß nicht wie ich es anders ausfrücken soll).
      Bei Jones geht im Kopf das ab: Alle denken ich bin Scheisse. Alle denken ich bin die Fehlentscheidung des Jahrhunderts. Die Fans sind gegen mich, also muss ich mehr liefern als alle anderen und darf keine Fehler machen....usw.
      Verstehst du was ich meine?
      Meddl Loide :rockon: :supz: :musi: :rock: :D
    • GermanRedskinsFan schrieb:

      Daywalker schrieb:

      GermanRedskinsFan schrieb:

      So wie es aussieht wollten die Giants Jones eben unbedingt haben, aber meiner Meinung nach eben zu teuer erkauft.
      Das größte Problem an der ganzen Sache ist aber der Hype der um diesen Pick gemacht wird und das vor allem von Giants Fans.
      Man muss bedenken das man es hier mit einem ganz jungen Spieler zu tun hat auf den dadurch ein enormer Druck aufgebaut wird und das ist sicher nicht im Sinne des Teams.
      Daniel Jones ist sicherlich kein schlechter Spieler (für mich kein 1st Round Pick, aber das spielt keine Rolle), aber man sollte aufpassen das man den Jungen nicht schon kaputt macht bevor er seinen ersten Ball geworfen hat.
      Damit muss doch jeder Top10 QB Pick umgehen. Egal ob Goff, Wentz, Murray, Mayfield, Darnold..., nur um mal die aus den letzten Jahren zu nennen, hatten/haben alle enormen Druck, das gehört dazu. Entweder er kann damit umgehen und hat das nötige Talent oder nicht, die Rechnung ist nicht anders als bei allen anderen auch, Hype und Druck gibts überall.
      Ja, da hast du recht, aber das ist ein anderes Ding.Alle Rookies haben diesen Druck. Der Unterschied ist aber das sie- wie soll ich sagen- Positiven Druck haben (weiß nicht wie ich es anders ausfrücken soll).
      Bei Jones geht im Kopf das ab: Alle denken ich bin Scheisse. Alle denken ich bin die Fehlentscheidung des Jahrhunderts. Die Fans sind gegen mich, also muss ich mehr liefern als alle anderen und darf keine Fehler machen....usw.
      Verstehst du was ich meine?
      Ja ich verstehe schon, aber da wird von Fanseite auch viel detaillierter darüber nachgedacht als bei den Protagonisten selber. Ein Mayfield wurde auch in gewissem Maße hinterfragt, da fragten sich auch einige wieso nicht Darnold oder Rosen gepickt wurden, die bei nicht wenigen höher angesiedelt wurden als Mayfield.
      Die Jungs werden sich nicht jedes Video und jeden Kommentar im Netz angucken, die wissen natürlich wie der Großteil der Öffentlichkeit über sie denkt, aber bei sogut wie jedem sind kritische Stimmen dabei, ein Teil der sich aufregt usw., da geht es garnicht um die genaue Anzahl. Man kann es auch so sehen, dass Jones eher überraschen kann. Von einem Murray erwarten alle dass er den nächsten Mahomes gibt, nicht nur dass er 1st Overall ist, für ihn wurde auch noch Rosen der erst letztes Jahr ein Top10 Pick war, weggetradet. Liefern müssen beide und Jones kann eher nur positiv überraschen, während bei jemand wie Murray eine tolle Rookie-Saison erwartet wird und alles was darunter ist, wird sofort hinterfragt ob es das alles wirklich wert war.

      Ich sehe da jetzt keine großen Unterschiede, alle QBs die hoch gedraftet wurden haben einen großen Druck, eine ganze Franchise samt den Verantwortlichen sind von dir als Spieler überzeugt, denen musst du in erster Linie mal das Vertrauen zurückzahlen, bei Fans und Experten gibt es immer viele unterschiedliche Meinungen, die gehen gerne auch mal weit auseinander und sie schlagen auch gerne mal deutlich ins negative.

      Steht Jones auf dem Feld und liefert nicht, dann kann ich ihn halt nicht mehr in Schutz nehmen als einen Murray, Mayfield, Rosen, Haskins oder sonst jemanden. Was ich machen kann, mir die Umstände und Gegebenheiten angucken, z.B. Coaching, O-Line, Mitspieler usw. und ob er in diesen Verhältnissen das beste daraus macht oder nicht, aber spielt Jones kacke, dann kriegt er sicher nicht mehr Welpenschutz als andere Rookie-QBs, ich kann dann halt nicht sagen, dass bei Jones einige Fans sich mehr aufgeregt haben und er deshalb mehr unter Druck stand, das funzt halt nicht und das wird auch nicht den Ausschlag geben.

      Das Gute ist, die Giants haben noch Eli an Bord, somit kann Jones erstmal dahinter aufgebaut werden, er muss nicht von Woche 1 auf dem Feld stehen und abliefern. Ein Murray z.B. muss das, Jones hingegen kann man da auch Zeit und etwas Ruhe verschaffen, aber wenn es dann soweit ist, dann wird er genauso gemessen wie alle anderen, Anzahl und Level kritischer Stimmen hin oder her.

      Dieser Beitrag wurde bereits 1 mal editiert, zuletzt von Daywalker ()

    • Rod Smith darf nach dem besten NFC Running Back jetzt den zweitbesten als Back-up unterstützen. Bruder Jaylon freut sich schon auf die 'Treffen' ;)

      giants.com/news/giants-sign-former-cowboys-rb-rod-smith
      "If Football doesn't work out behind the center, he is gonna be one heck of a football coach.
      And I wouldn't want to play against his team!"
      Jon Gruden on Kellen Moore - QB Camp 2012
    • 1 Year 2,5 Mio. Mal sehen wer sich da durchsetzt, Wohl eher kaum zu erwarten da da einer der 3 zu den Besseren der Liga gehöhren wird . Mit der O line steht und fällt weiter Eli und das auf Grund seiner Immobilität halt noch deutlich heftiger als andere QBS .

      Alles in allem sollte die Line aber nun doch etwas besser sein als die Jahre zuvor

      bigblueview.com/2019/5/11/1861…-mike-remmers-news-rumors
      I can, I will
    • Einen leichten Stand hat der Junge Mann auf jeden FAll immer noch nciht

      "New York fans at a Yankees baseball game booed Giants rookie quarterback Daniel Jones when he appeared on the video board Monday night.
      For his part, the first-year signal-caller dismissed the hullabaloo on Tuesday during a discussion on The Rich Eisen Show."

      Wenn er das alles echt "überlebt" und es schafft ist er mental auf jede Fall auf einiges inkl NY Medien vorbereitet
      I can, I will
    • Benutzer online 2

      2 Mitglieder (davon 2 unsichtbar)